old cameras


Time to take a look at some of my old camera collection.

 

Nikon Nikkormat FTN
Nikon Nikkormat FTN

 

Nikkormat SLRs were simpler, more affordable alternatives to Nikon’s professional level Nikon F and F2 SLRs. The Nikkormat FTn was manufactured from 1967 to 1975. 

Argus C3
Argus C3

The Argus C3 was a low-priced rangefinder camera mass-produced from 1939 to 1966 by Argus in Ann ArborMichiganUSA. The camera sold about 2 million units, making it one of the most popular cameras in history. Due to its shape, size, and weight, it is commonly referred to as “The Brick” by photographers (in Japan its nickname translates as “The Lunchbox“). The most famous 20th-century photographer who used it wasTony Vaccaro, who employed this model during World War II.

Cosina Voigtlander T101 with 35mm f2.5 Classic lens
Cosina Voigtlander T101 with 35mm f2.5 Classic lens

 

The first model was the Bessa L, introduced in 1999. This was a finderless body with a Leica screw mount. It was introduced with a range of Voigtländer 39mm screw lenses that were quite inexpensive and said to be of excellent quality. It could of course mount all the wide variety of 39mm screw lenses by manufacturers as diverse as LeicaCanonNikon and even cheaper but often excellent Soviet lenses.

 

The Bessa L was mostly intended to be used with ultra wide angle lenses, with which the absence of a focusing device is not a problem. Most notably Voigtländer introduced a 15mm and a 12mm lens, the latter being the widest rectilinear lens ever marketed.

 

The Bessa L has TTL metering with LED readout on the back edge of the top plate with an ASA range of 25–1600 and an EV range 1 to 19 at ASA 100. The readout consists of two red arrows pointing to a green light in between that enables use of the camera as, effectively, a shutter priority, aperture priority, or totally manual camera.

 

On some markets, the Voigtländer Bessa L was sold as the Cosina SW-107.

 

The Bessa L was supplemented in 2001 by the Bessa T, which used the Leica M-mount, could receive a trigger advance design, and had an integrated rangefinder with high magnification, but no viewfinder. It was sold in silver or black; from 2002, also in gray or olive (at a higher price and perhaps only in Japan). It is now discontinued but some stock is still available.

 In 2001, the Bessa T was sold in a special kit, called 101st Anniversary (in short “T101”), with a 50mm f:3.5 collapsible Heliar lens, for the anniversary of the Voigtländer Heliar lens design. It existed in black, grey, olive and blue: five hundred numbered examples were produced for each color.

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2 classic film single lens reflex cameras


Nikon FM with MD-11 motor drive and Pentax Spotmatic both with f1.4 50mm lenses

 

Nikon FM
Nikon FM

This camera was purchased new by my late father who ramped up his interest in photography when he retired.  It is a shame that he got this just a few years before autofocus hit consumer level 35mm film slr cameras.  He struggled mightily with his bifocals and the FM viewfinder, also with getting a decent exposure for his photos.  For some reason he liked to shoot color slides and slides are unforgiving when it comes to exposure.

Pentax Spotmatic
Pentax Spotmatic

The Spotmatic was introduced by Asahi Pentax in 1964. Fully mechanical SLR film camera using 35mm film.  A small switch on the (photographer’s) left side of the lens housing was pushed up to stop down the lens and activate the meter; the exposure controls would then be adjusted to center a needle on the right edge of the viewfinder. The body took lenses with an M42 screw thread.

German film SLR from 1960 – Voigtlander Bessamatic with f4 135mm lens


I head to Toronto tomorrow for some medical appointments. I plan to load this baby tonight and will probably take off the 135mm lens and put on either the 35mm or 50mm lens. HP5 400 ISO from ILFORD is the film of choice.

When I get the film processed and scan the negatives of downtown Toronto, I will add some shots with the camera with the three different lenses mounted and some closeups of the controls.
Keep an eye out for that post in about two weeks time.

2147 views US ARMY Rangefinder camera 70mm – Graflex Combat Graphic


In 2002 on a road trip to South Carolina, I stopped off in Fayetteville, NC, to visit the Airborne Museum and took this photograph of this enormous rangefinder camera. It has been viewed over 2100 times in my photostream on flickr.com. Curious what attracts views.

“its a Graflex Combat Graphic – made for the US armed forces and took 70mm film.”

Combat Graflex sometimes referred to as a Combat 70 or Gulliver’s Contax.  Designed by Zeiss Ikon’s Hubert Nerwin. Resembles a Contax II on steroids.  Madfe between 1953 and 1957 and used by the US ARMY SIGNAL CORP up to and including the early years of the Viet Nam War.

Google for more info, but as a start try this: www.geh.org/fm/mees/htmlsrc/mG736700001_ful.h tml

gone skating 6×9 photo image


Frozen harbour at Midland, Ont. from a few years back. In the background ice fishing huts. Pure winter at its best.

camerosity stuff of the tech kind: If memory serves, this is a scan from a negative.  the negative was 6x9cm frame from the 120 film camera:  Agfa Billy Record III, a folding camera with an uncoupled rangefinder and a 105mm “normal lens“.  You must set everything on this camera.  Look through the uncoupled rangefinder and determine distance, set it on the lens. Set the aperture.  Set the shutter speed.  Having determined exposure either by sunny 16 rule or with a handheld exposure meter.  Oh and you have to cock the shutter.  Film advance is by a dial on the top, you peer through a red window in the camera back to see the film number which tips you off to stop turning.

Seems like I cropped the image some.  I bought mine refurbished.  I hope to get it out this year and run some film through it. It folds up to a very compact size.

AGFA BILLY RECORD III

6cmX9cm negative folding camera Agfa Record III Billy


I bought this refurbished old 120 roll camera back just after 2001f o $250.

It is an ideal folding travel camera and fits in a jacket pocket easily when all buttoned up.

Sample photograph

National Shrine of St. Elizabeth Seton – Basilica

Agfa Record Billy III with Apotar 105mm f4.5 lens using Kodak 400 VC 120 film – just refound these misplaced negatives from a trip made in 2003.

 

National Shrine of St. Elizabeth Seton - Basilica