Polaroid 660


Polaroid 660 Sun Camera, purchased new by me, still in my collection of cameras.

The Polaroid Autofocus 660: a square-bodied instant camera in Polaroid‘s 600-series. It was the first in the range to use Polaroid’s patented Sonar Autofocus device. The distance to the subject was calculated by firing an infra-red beam that bounced back to a gold-coloured receiver behind a plastic grille.

  • Lens: 116mm, f/11, Single-element plastic.
  • Sonar autofocus (sharpest at 4-5 feet).
  • Shutter: electronic; automatic speed between 1/4-1/200 sec.
  • Integral auto flash that works in low light but cannot be forced on or off.
  • Polaroid’s Light Management System (the darken/lighten exposure correction slider).

600 series

When people talk about Polaroid cameras, most people mean the popular and relatively cheap models of the 1980s and 1990s that used film packs with integral batteries – 600 series.

Prints measure 79mm (3.1″) square with white border.

Prints took some 3 minutes to fully develop at 70°F (21°C).

The film has an ISO rating of 640.

The film was branded using different names: “Extreme 600” and “Notepad“.

A high definition “professional” film named “779” was also sold.

Some of the cameras had ‘sonar’ autofocus and/or featured glass lenses, but most had plastic lenses with a fixed focus of around 4 feet.

A “close-up” lens was often included, but this took the form of a simple plastic meniscus that slid into place.

Many of the models are functionally identical to others but have different coloured fascia, names and stickers according to marketing territory. Several models were limited editions with tie-ins to icons of popular culture, such as Barbie or the Spice Girls, while other versions were promotional items made for corporate entities and are now highly collectible thanks to their rarity.

Polaroids were the brainchildren of Dr. Edwin Land

Polaroid Highlander Instant Film Camera Model 80a


donation to my camera collection, thanks Angie and Mikeintroduced 1959

Lens: 100mm f/8.8, 3-element glass
Shutter: 2-speed rotary-leaf design with speeds of 1/25th of a second and 1/100 of a second, plus bulb
Flash: M-sync via Polaroid “hot shoe
Exposure set by Polaroid Light Value scale. (Standard EV scale on 80A and 80B).
Rigid viewfinder on top of camera.
Distance focus by rotating lens front-element.
Self-erecting bellows design.
Steel body painted gray for model 80, brown – 80A & 80B.
Most (but not all) model 80’s have chrome plated trim, especially noticeable on the lens ring. Some model 80’s and all 80A and 80B have polished steel trim.

used Type 30 film

Polaroid Highlander manual
Polaroid Highlander manual

A curve in the Highway near my home


hwy12 by gnawledge wurker
hwy12, a photo by gnawledge wurker on Flickr.

This was taken in February 2006. The variations in winter is not snow or no snow but how early it arrives and whether we get small, gentle snowfalls or a series of harsh blizzards. The other factor is the number of truly cold days, those dropping to the nasty zone of -28 degrees Celsius. Last year 2011-12 was a very mild winter in both of those sensations. This year was colder and the snow fall not momumentally or blitzkrieg-like, just steady and now Spring seems to be shy about tunring up in all its glory. On one plus side of the weather ledger we had only a hint of freezing rain on two days. So at least we could safely drive our cars while bundled up in our winter clothes and boots. It will be as it always is a thrill to peel down to wearing just shorts and shirts comfortably out of doors. I don’t think I could live in a place without four seasons.

Chung’s Candy & Soda Stand – NYC – 1994?


This was shot by me on my sole trip to NYC back in 1994. Nowadays you won’t see quite so much cigarette advertising. Canera 35mm film, Pentax PZ-1 w 28-80 zoom lens

365 #5 – DSC_4389e War of 1812 camp Canada Day Little Lake Park, Midland, Ontario 2012


Nikon D3100 shot, encampment with re enactors, celebrating Canada Day 2012, Midland, Ontario, Canada