had a kidney for two minutes


Not your average day.

For about two minutes I had a donated kidney for transplant.

I had the call about fifty minutes before I spoke to Jamie

The call was to explain that there were two issues regarding the donor kidney, slight risks.

I accepted the kidney.

That means I would have gone to Toronto and the kidney would have been put in sometime in the next twelve hours or so.  If it was working correctly which was likely it would have worked right away. Then the trick is to control rejection.  This is fairly commonplace.

But

The doctor making the call asked me about my general health.

I explained the low hemoglobin and two tests, endoscopy and colonoscopy scheduled for Nov. 25th.

He said that was a show stopper.

So I handed the kidney back so to speak.  I had it for about two minutes.

Surreal.

I decided to call the dialysis unit in Penetang they were just finishing up Saturday.  They were very empathetic  and suggested that I should  I call the two scopes doctor and tell him about this offer and see if the scope could not be moved up.

My sister was pretty upset, upset for me.  I am bit dazed to be honest.

So I am at the very top of the transplant list.  But I am temporarily “off” it to get this hemoglobin question answered.

On Monday end of the day I see my family doctor as was arranged last week and will discuss the situation.  Perhaps the scopes can get mover up.  Perhaps a cancellation.

The unknown is what is causing the low hemoglobin and what can be done to fix me up and of course how long will it take to schedule and how long to make the necessary improvement happen.

Meanwhile my 6th anniversary of dialysis falls in the first week of November.

first swim of 2006


first swim of 2006 by gnawledge wurker
first swim of 2006, a photo by gnawledge wurker on Flickr.

from my flickr posting in 2006: “I dont know why but this year Shakey was less interested in starting the swimming season. In the past he and his sister would have gone in even with the remnants of ice on shore. At any rate, yesterday he went for his first swim of the season. He also managed to find the skeleton of a large fish, a muskellunge.

I am always amused when he finds a dead fish washed up on shore and goes and rolls on it. I understand that this is to mask his scent. The only trouble is I have this mental image that forms of a couple of bunnies in the woods, a half mile from shore, sniffing the air. One says to the other, “Gee, I wonder what a dead fish is doing walking into our woods.”

It was 22 C. yesterday, warm enough for shorts for me. On the other hand, a few days ago the temperature dropped for two days and we had highs of just 2 above freezing. We have a curious Spring in these parts.”

Shakespeare passed away at age ten years and three months.  He was a wonderful dog and we miss him.  The dog in our lives now is Miss Grace, who is four years old and still very much a pup.

heel progress report


“Fantastic,” said the plastic surgeon looking at the healing of my heel, excuse the redundancy of that. A ferociously difficult drive through the steady rain down from Georgian Bay to downtown Toronto to St. Michael’s Hospital.  It was like driving through a 100 mile long car wash. I really detest that dull silvery grey low visibility look like the inside of a dirty fish tank.  With   so much rain there was a ton of spray being whipped around by cars and trucks.  I managed to pry my fingers off the steering wheel in the parking lot and schlepped over to the hospital with my aircast on soaking my open to the elements socked left foot.  Must think of a plastic bag cover one of these days.  A bit of slough (dead tissue) removed and a follow up appointment for the 2oth just five days before the big red suited guy lands. Clinic staff exceptionally upbeat, cheery, and energetic without being at all annoying about that, which was refreshing.

Miss Bella watches – taken before dialysis


It is often difficult to get a good photo of a black cat or dog. You end up with a silhouette. This one of Bella is not bad.

I checked the EXIF data and hmm, i had thought I took this with the external flash attached. But perhaps not. It was taken in summer 2008 when my renal failure was progressing rapidly to the point where I entered the dialysis treatment in November via the crash method. I was in deep denial and fear about the whole thing and had stopped seeing my nephrologist and at that time had no family doctor. One of the blessings of this past year is I finally got a family doctor up here in God’s country.

That denial period was one more example of the stupid moves in my rather silly life. At least when i was suffering from congestive heart failure I managed to summon enough brain cells to walk into Emergency.

bin here, bin filled, bin gone


A major item on the to do list got done last week. The cottage was built in 1969/70 here on Georgian Bay. A few years later a one car garage kit was put up as a boathouse/storage building. Since the late 1980s, the water level receded and the 14 foot aluminum boat has sat in the boat house along with its cradle and boat track rails waiting for the Bay to come back. It hasn’t. During the 1990s, my father and mother passed away after some illnesses and the boathouse continued to accumulate materials of various kinds.

Also around the property, bits and pieces of decks and stairs and even some original yellow plywood window flaps had been tucked away in various corners. Dock sections and shore line defense (wire baskets known as gabeons). The guiding principle was “keep it for it might be useful down the road”.

Well, practically none of it has turned out to be useful. So after much discussion and some procrastination, a bin was ordered. What size do you order? Hard to say. But a 20 yarder was dropped off bright and early one Wednesday morning. It was scheduled for a week’s stay.

30 years = 1.65 metric tonnes

Now, I have a history of blowing out my back. It goes back to my 18th year when a boulder needed shifting on the property here and no bulldozer was available, so I volunteered and damaged my lower transverse ligaments. Since then periodically, my back goes “out”. Having developed a good sized gut over the years has not helped. So I decided to take it slow and easy.

The first day I worked for about 45 minutes loading stuff carefully along one side of the bin. I wanted to leave room for some sizable wooden dock sections. To move these I had asked for some help. Two fellows were going to come by on the Friday. I did another 45 minute session of loading and called it a day.

That night it snowed and kept on snowing to the tune of 6 inches. I spent time on Thursday pulling pieces of this and that out of the corners of the boathouse. Friday I just stared at the snow trying to will it to melt. The fellows did not come on Friday. On Saturday more work pulling things out and getting them stacked up to load. Sunday the snow finally melted away. Monday morning I did a little more work loading and then sat down to wait and see if the two fellows were going to come as planned at 9:30 am. If they showed up, then the dock would go in. If they did not, the space I had preserved in the bin for the dock would go to other items and the dock would have to go next year.

They showed, well, one guy showed, not good news. It meant that I would have to help move five dock sections planked tops over a 2 inch x12inch frame structure 5 feet x8 feet long. Heavy, heavy, heavy, heavy, and slightly less heavy (one section was a little smaller than the rest).

My back began to ache as we sized them up. However, after a little fussing and thinking, we ended up tipping them up on their ends and flipping them over and over on their ends to the bin, a distance of about 80 feet. My back survived. Three old sets of wooden deck steps got sledge hammered into pieces and the morning’s work was done. Thanks to Jamie the dock sections made it into the bin. I did about 25% of the hefting on those, he did the rest.

30 years worth getting picked up

Tuesday some more odds and ends: old glass windows, two old lead pane windows from the old 1939 built North Toronto house (why they got brought up I will never know), old lawn mower, old curtain tracks, bits of metal, my mother’s old wheelchair (should have donated that back in 1996 the year of her death), old fibre board, pieces of 1970 panelling quarter inch plywood, old shingles (been sitting for 20 years outside), and old this and old that and I was done. Totally beat.

Called Wednesday morning and they picked it up around noon.

30 years of stuff rolling away

1.65 metric tonnes = 3638.25 pounds
that is a lot of stuff – 30 years worth

end of October


It has been a semi-lousy Fall with lots of rainy days. Today has been a high wind day. Georgian Bay has been large-waved and the water level has been the highest of the year. A ton of leaves are wet and waiting to be raked up, put in large plastic bags. They then get driven to the local transfer station (the dump). They then are dumped out on the great leaf pile. 60 bags (large clear plastic bags, a little larger than your standard green garbage bagis the current local world’s record. Leaves hang too long on some trees. Other trees drop them fast. It is tricky to try and get them done before the late Fall rains and the early snow. It is a sad time of the year. I see the things that got done, the things that will have to wait another year. I hope the warm weather does not draw me away from the chores that need to be chored.