my attitude to Toronto Police and their G20 actions


From 1958 (age 5) until 2000 I lived in Toronto.  I have never been arrested.  One of my few interactions with the police took place around 1990 in The Beaches.  I left my basement apartment and found just outside my door in the alleyway a police warrant card on the ground.  Turns out it belonged to a young constable who was visiting his grandmother and dropped it in his haste to get on his way to work.  I turned it in at a Division in the East End.  Another interaction took place one Saturday afternoon on Jarvis just below Bloor.  A man in a car was trying to force a woman into his car.  I got out of my car and two other men got out of their car and we moved to stop the takin of the woman.  When he saw us move at him, he drove off and a few moments later about ten cruisers caught him further north on Jarvis which turns into Mount Pleasant Road.  I was lucky that day, the man might have had a handgun, but I was determined not to just standby.  It turns out the woman  was a prostitute and the man was her pimp.

I live 100 miles north now.  For many years I wanted to visit New Orleans, a perfect city for a photographer to point his camera at, but never went because its police force had a dreadful reputation. I have to got to Toronto for medical appointments and if I get a kidney transplant it will be done there and the many followup appointments will be there as well.  My thoughts now are that I will never travel to Toronto again unless I must for medical reasons.  I do not want to run afoul of the police, who seem to have the potential to do whatever they want to without regard to the law.

my Friday overfloweth


Lots on my plate today.

 

  1. visited the Ellery Site, sw of Waverley, Ontario, on provincially owned land where Laurentian University Department of Anthropology held an archaeology field school.  Two Huron villages, one dated to the 1400s based on distinctive pottery style, and one to the contact (French trade and occupation in Huronia) roughly 1600 (trade goods coming up from Quebec and eastern shore of Canada) and 1650 (the year after the catstrophic war with the Iroquois when the Hurons abandoned the area).  Thanks to Robert Brown who guided me around.
  2. Dialysis, almost late. Went smooth enough until the very end when my blood pressure dropped. I felt lightheaded  when I stood up at the end of the run. They had to hand me several cups of cranberry juice.  Took almost 20 minutes to get it back up to 124 over 70. It had dipped to 88 over something or other when I stood up.  We conclude that we got too aggressive and took off too much fluid. Not a big concern.  I felt bad for taking so long on a Friday to get out after the run.  But not my fault.
  3. Attended an art show opening at the Huronia Museum, Alethia  photographs by Nick Anest, amateur photographer – Nick Anest was born in Midland in 1929 to Greek immigrant parents who ran The Midland Candy Works.  The people of Midland knew Nick Anest as the proprietor of “Uptown Billiards”.  Parking lot was packed, huge turnout.  Show celebrates community, family, multiculturalism.