Snow Wallop April 15


image imageWoke to find elevator crash drop in temperature from 17 celsius to minus 5 celsius and several inches of snow. All those early Spring returning birds will have a hard day.  Temperature high tomorrow will be zero celsius.  Wednesday to climb to 5 above.  Photos from my kitchen door.  100 miles north of Toronto.

It has been an unusually fierce winter and it has dragged on into Spring.  There has been extra snow from the seasonal usual and a large number of very cold days.  Spring in Central Ontario is not much of a season, cold, rainy, grey days.  Lots of mud.  Summer bursts out like a sudden surprise. It is not a gradual improvement, instead it pops out and the hot weather descends.  All the green plants turn on their colours like some giant turning a light switch.

 

first swim of 2006


first swim of 2006 by gnawledge wurker
first swim of 2006, a photo by gnawledge wurker on Flickr.

from my flickr posting in 2006: “I dont know why but this year Shakey was less interested in starting the swimming season. In the past he and his sister would have gone in even with the remnants of ice on shore. At any rate, yesterday he went for his first swim of the season. He also managed to find the skeleton of a large fish, a muskellunge.

I am always amused when he finds a dead fish washed up on shore and goes and rolls on it. I understand that this is to mask his scent. The only trouble is I have this mental image that forms of a couple of bunnies in the woods, a half mile from shore, sniffing the air. One says to the other, “Gee, I wonder what a dead fish is doing walking into our woods.”

It was 22 C. yesterday, warm enough for shorts for me. On the other hand, a few days ago the temperature dropped for two days and we had highs of just 2 above freezing. We have a curious Spring in these parts.”

Shakespeare passed away at age ten years and three months.  He was a wonderful dog and we miss him.  The dog in our lives now is Miss Grace, who is four years old and still very much a pup.

TUG PRESCOTT, MIDLAND TUGFEST 2013


if you click the image you will jump to my flickr account and will find in the Tugfest set several more shots taken at Tugfest 2013 this morning in Midland, Ontario, Canada. Nikon DSLR D3100 mostly with the 18-55mm lens.

2 chairs contemplate the COLDWATER RIVER


If there is a more peaceful village than Coldwater, Ontario, I would be surprised. The Coldwater River flows through town and north to Georgian Bay. This spot is very very close to the “downtown core” of the village. I took this shot standing on an old Bailey Bridge section. Some wonderful large. old wood and brick homes along this part of the river.

In September, Coldwater has one of the best fall fairs in central Ontario.  Just across Hwy 12 at the south end of the village is the Coldwater Canadiana Museum, small but delightful.

Equipment – SONY NEX F3 with lens adapter to mount Contax/Yashica mount Tokina mf 28-70 zoom lens f3.5, shot at f11. Modified image using Corel Paint Shop Pro x5.

rained out photo jaunt


my camera icon

The rain stopped after overnight steadiness and I headed off along Highway 12 for the Fall Fair at Orillia but soon after I began the monsoon avalanched heavy rain.  So I stopped partway to Orillia and had lunch at Tiffany’s Restaurant in Coldwater, Ontario.

I ended up in conversation with a senior couple and their daughter.  He is 88 years old and was a truck driver for Canadian Ordnance Corps in Northeast Europe.  He described meeting a school buddy in Ghent who was too embarassed to admit he that he was shot in the buttocks during the Battle of the Hochwald Forest (Operation Veritable and Operation Blockbuster).

from the wikipedia article “After the war, General Dwight Eisenhower, the Allied Supreme Commander, commented this “was some of the fiercest fighting of the whole war” and “a bitter slugging match in which the enemy had to be forced back yard by yard”.”

This gentleman weighed 140 lbs when he went in the Army and weighs that today. It was a great pleasure and privilege to speak with a World War Two veteran.  This gentleman has a razor sharp memory.  We talked about lake levels in the Great Lakes and fierce local weather. He has an avid interest in weather and runs his own home weather station.  He remarked on the extreme low pressure that followed a harsh storm that blew through on Friday, barometric pressure was as low as that experienced with hurricanes.

Tiffany’s Restaurant, Coldwater, Ontario
wood detail of store front in Coldwater, Ontario
old signs on side of store front in Coldwater, Ontario

1640s Huron Village St Ignace II altar


Saint Gabriel Lallemant
Saint Gabriel Lallemant (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

DSC_5553 St Ignace II altar by gnawledge wurker
DSC_5553 St Ignace II altar, a photo by gnawledge wurker on Flickr.

description by T. Fegarty “In 1649 St. Ignace II, as named by the Jesuit missionaries who visited or lived there, was a relatively new Wendat village on a plateau about 50 feet above what is now known as the Sturgeon River in Tay Township. The village proper comprised 29 buildings, including a chapel – priests’ residence, occupied some 6 acres, and was surrounded by fortifications measuring some 2,000 feet in the round, including 2 main gateways. About 2 thousand people lived there.

The Wendat chose village sites for their defensive advantages: high ground, surrounding river and/or ravine and nearby year-round spring. Villages were fortified by palisades of pine trunks, some 15 feet tall. The people lived in long-houses, about 20 feet in width and up to 100 feet in length, with 20-100 people per house. These dwellings were constructed of saplings, their pointed and charred ends planted in holes in the ground. A census of the Huron nation by the Jesuits in 1639 reported 32 active villages, consisting of about 700 lodges and 20,000 people.

1649 saw the culmination of the war between the Wendat and their French allies against the Iroquois confederacy based in what is now upper New York State. A large Iroquois war party attacked and overran several Wendat villages, including St. Ignace II. At nearby St. Louis, on the Hogg River, the raiders captured two Jesuit missionaries, Jean de Brebeuf and Gabriel Lalemant, and brought them to St Ignace II, where they were tortured and killed. These events led the Jesuits to abandon and burn their headquarters at Ste. Marie on the Wye River, after burying the remains of Brebeuf there. They then retreated with their remaining Wendat converts first to Christian Island and then to Quebec in the following year. They took with them relics (small bone fragments) of the martyrs.”

shore edge


Image

Image = shore edge in front of my home on the eastern end of Georgian Bay, which is the east end of Lake Huron, one of the Great Lakes of North America.  I have been living up here 100 miles north of Toronto for twelve years (fulltime).  My family rented here in the sixties and then bought a lot and built this cottage in 1969-70.  It is a beautiful place and I am fortunate to live here.

until the shore growth got high enough to hide predators, families of Canada Geese would amble in to crop away at the plant life…..it is fun to watch the tiny golden goslings mature into as of this week nearly full-sized geese.. the neck stretching guard adult geese are careful in their watching and quickly sound the alarm when they dont like something in the area, which produces a mad rush and much splashing as the family skedaddles out into the safety of the bayy

Sony H50 camera

Hogg Bay Trestle Bridge 2141 feet long, 1908-1978


scan of an old print of a photo I took back in 1975 — Spanning the waters of Hogg Bay, a great wooden trestle bridge was built in 1908 to carry the Canadian Pacific Railroad from grain elevators at Port McNicholl. 2141 feet long and 50 feet high, it was one of the longest wooden structures on the continent. The pine timbers were 8 feet by 16 feet and pilings of B.C. fir were 65 feet long. The builder was Mike McPeake of Port McNicholl. Patrolled by armed guards in both World Wars, this unique and handsome bridge was last used in 1971 and demolished in 1978.

to see two more photos of mine of the trestle see this link to an earlier post

Hogg Bay Trestle Bridge photos


was torn down before 1980, near Victoria Harbour, Ontario

 

Spanning the waters of Hog Bay, a great wooden trestle bridge was built in 1908 to carry the Canadian Pacific Railroad from grain elevators at Port McNicoll. 2141 feet long and 50 feet high, it was one of the longest wooden structures on the continent. The pine timbers were 8 feet by 16 feet and pilings of B.C. fir were 65 feet long. The builder was Mike McPeake of Port McNicoll. Patrolled by armed guards in both World Wars, this unique and handsome bridge was last used in 1971 and demolished in 1978.

 

I took these photos in around 1975.