2 classic film single lens reflex cameras


Nikon FM with MD-11 motor drive and Pentax Spotmatic both with f1.4 50mm lenses

 

Nikon FM
Nikon FM

This camera was purchased new by my late father who ramped up his interest in photography when he retired.  It is a shame that he got this just a few years before autofocus hit consumer level 35mm film slr cameras.  He struggled mightily with his bifocals and the FM viewfinder, also with getting a decent exposure for his photos.  For some reason he liked to shoot color slides and slides are unforgiving when it comes to exposure.

Pentax Spotmatic
Pentax Spotmatic

The Spotmatic was introduced by Asahi Pentax in 1964. Fully mechanical SLR film camera using 35mm film.  A small switch on the (photographer’s) left side of the lens housing was pushed up to stop down the lens and activate the meter; the exposure controls would then be adjusted to center a needle on the right edge of the viewfinder. The body took lenses with an M42 screw thread.

TUG PRESCOTT, MIDLAND TUGFEST 2013


if you click the image you will jump to my flickr account and will find in the Tugfest set several more shots taken at Tugfest 2013 this morning in Midland, Ontario, Canada. Nikon DSLR D3100 mostly with the 18-55mm lens.

Jaguar E Type V12 convertible


Jaguar E Type V12 convertible – saw this yesterday in Orillia, startling how low to the ground it sits.

March 2008, the Jaguar E-Type ranked first in a The Daily Telegraph online list of the world’s “100 most beautiful cars” of all time

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jaguar_E-Type

DSC01815 Jaguar E type V12 DSC01816e DSC01816tight crop ee DSC01817e logo

2147 views US ARMY Rangefinder camera 70mm – Graflex Combat Graphic


In 2002 on a road trip to South Carolina, I stopped off in Fayetteville, NC, to visit the Airborne Museum and took this photograph of this enormous rangefinder camera. It has been viewed over 2100 times in my photostream on flickr.com. Curious what attracts views.

“its a Graflex Combat Graphic – made for the US armed forces and took 70mm film.”

Combat Graflex sometimes referred to as a Combat 70 or Gulliver’s Contax.  Designed by Zeiss Ikon’s Hubert Nerwin. Resembles a Contax II on steroids.  Madfe between 1953 and 1957 and used by the US ARMY SIGNAL CORP up to and including the early years of the Viet Nam War.

Google for more info, but as a start try this: www.geh.org/fm/mees/htmlsrc/mG736700001_ful.h tml

Balda Baldinette 35mm film folding viewfinder camera


Balda Baldinette 35mm film folding viewfinder camera

Balda Baldinette 35mm film folding viewfinder camera

triplet photograph above shows the camera closed, the back with the information plate, and open, A compact folding viewfinder camera, the Balda Baldinette made in 1950s by Balda Bunde Kamera-Werk in West-Germany.

Type: 35mm film folding viewfinder.

A very modest viewfinder.

Shutter speed 1-1/300 and B.

Aperture settings f3.5-f16, even though the pointer turns quite a bit over the 16 and under the 3.5, so perhaps f2.8-f22.

Focus distance is between 1.2m to infinity.

It also has a self-timer, cable release option and a tripod mount.

Lenses included:
Balda Baldanar 50mm f/3.5
Balda Baldanar 50mm f/2.9
Balda Baltar 50mm f/2.9
Schneider Radionar 50mm f/3.5
Schneider Radionar 50mm f/2.9

The above five lenses are listed from least to most expensive.[2]
Isco Westar 50mm f/3.5 – my example has this lens.

1953, the Baldinette sold in the USA for US$40 (equivalent to US$317 in 2009). Copies with red and blue leatherette are known, but very rare.

The shutter needs to be cocked before firing.
In order to advance the film, you need to press in a safety button, preventing involuntary film advancing. After you advance a frame, the safety is locked until you fire the shutter again, so you can’t advance more then one frame at a time.

Polaroid 660


Polaroid 660 Sun Camera, purchased new by me, still in my collection of cameras.

The Polaroid Autofocus 660: a square-bodied instant camera in Polaroid‘s 600-series. It was the first in the range to use Polaroid’s patented Sonar Autofocus device. The distance to the subject was calculated by firing an infra-red beam that bounced back to a gold-coloured receiver behind a plastic grille.

  • Lens: 116mm, f/11, Single-element plastic.
  • Sonar autofocus (sharpest at 4-5 feet).
  • Shutter: electronic; automatic speed between 1/4-1/200 sec.
  • Integral auto flash that works in low light but cannot be forced on or off.
  • Polaroid’s Light Management System (the darken/lighten exposure correction slider).

600 series

When people talk about Polaroid cameras, most people mean the popular and relatively cheap models of the 1980s and 1990s that used film packs with integral batteries – 600 series.

Prints measure 79mm (3.1″) square with white border.

Prints took some 3 minutes to fully develop at 70°F (21°C).

The film has an ISO rating of 640.

The film was branded using different names: “Extreme 600” and “Notepad“.

A high definition “professional” film named “779” was also sold.

Some of the cameras had ‘sonar’ autofocus and/or featured glass lenses, but most had plastic lenses with a fixed focus of around 4 feet.

A “close-up” lens was often included, but this took the form of a simple plastic meniscus that slid into place.

Many of the models are functionally identical to others but have different coloured fascia, names and stickers according to marketing territory. Several models were limited editions with tie-ins to icons of popular culture, such as Barbie or the Spice Girls, while other versions were promotional items made for corporate entities and are now highly collectible thanks to their rarity.

Polaroids were the brainchildren of Dr. Edwin Land