old cameras


Time to take a look at some of my old camera collection.

 

Nikon Nikkormat FTN
Nikon Nikkormat FTN

 

Nikkormat SLRs were simpler, more affordable alternatives to Nikon’s professional level Nikon F and F2 SLRs. The Nikkormat FTn was manufactured from 1967 to 1975. 

Argus C3
Argus C3

The Argus C3 was a low-priced rangefinder camera mass-produced from 1939 to 1966 by Argus in Ann ArborMichiganUSA. The camera sold about 2 million units, making it one of the most popular cameras in history. Due to its shape, size, and weight, it is commonly referred to as “The Brick” by photographers (in Japan its nickname translates as “The Lunchbox“). The most famous 20th-century photographer who used it wasTony Vaccaro, who employed this model during World War II.

Cosina Voigtlander T101 with 35mm f2.5 Classic lens
Cosina Voigtlander T101 with 35mm f2.5 Classic lens

 

The first model was the Bessa L, introduced in 1999. This was a finderless body with a Leica screw mount. It was introduced with a range of Voigtländer 39mm screw lenses that were quite inexpensive and said to be of excellent quality. It could of course mount all the wide variety of 39mm screw lenses by manufacturers as diverse as LeicaCanonNikon and even cheaper but often excellent Soviet lenses.

 

The Bessa L was mostly intended to be used with ultra wide angle lenses, with which the absence of a focusing device is not a problem. Most notably Voigtländer introduced a 15mm and a 12mm lens, the latter being the widest rectilinear lens ever marketed.

 

The Bessa L has TTL metering with LED readout on the back edge of the top plate with an ASA range of 25–1600 and an EV range 1 to 19 at ASA 100. The readout consists of two red arrows pointing to a green light in between that enables use of the camera as, effectively, a shutter priority, aperture priority, or totally manual camera.

 

On some markets, the Voigtländer Bessa L was sold as the Cosina SW-107.

 

The Bessa L was supplemented in 2001 by the Bessa T, which used the Leica M-mount, could receive a trigger advance design, and had an integrated rangefinder with high magnification, but no viewfinder. It was sold in silver or black; from 2002, also in gray or olive (at a higher price and perhaps only in Japan). It is now discontinued but some stock is still available.

 In 2001, the Bessa T was sold in a special kit, called 101st Anniversary (in short “T101”), with a 50mm f:3.5 collapsible Heliar lens, for the anniversary of the Voigtländer Heliar lens design. It existed in black, grey, olive and blue: five hundred numbered examples were produced for each color.

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German film SLR from 1960 – Voigtlander Bessamatic with f4 135mm lens


I head to Toronto tomorrow for some medical appointments. I plan to load this baby tonight and will probably take off the 135mm lens and put on either the 35mm or 50mm lens. HP5 400 ISO from ILFORD is the film of choice.

When I get the film processed and scan the negatives of downtown Toronto, I will add some shots with the camera with the three different lenses mounted and some closeups of the controls.
Keep an eye out for that post in about two weeks time.

a little typewriter hunting


Typewriter hunting

I took a drive down south of Barrie to the 400 Antique Mart just off the 400 super highway that runs down to Toronto.

Just three typewriters.  One, an early SCM office electric with no power cord.  One Underwood 5, rightly described as mint condition, but asking a silly, that is beyond outrageous price of $198.00.  I acquired an Underwood 5 not in mint condition from the Huronia Museum for $10.  The Underwood 5 was made in very large numbers, many have survived and the Underwood 5 is normally a 10-15 dollar item.  Worth adding to your collection, but not an item to kid yourself into paying 200 dollars.  They were an early practically indestructible office typewriter. OTOH it was the cleanest typewriter I have ever seen.  At the other end of the Mart another Underwood 5 asking a semi-comical $49.  I passed on all three.

I took a few photos in the Mart and one of an old Dodge up in Coldwater, Ontario.

I was fortunate in Barrie on the way home.  Went to Staples,  parking lot was awfully full.  Then I remembered it was the end of the afternoon of the first day back to school.  Last second school supplies were being sought.   I went backwards a few steps in the technology and bought a Brother electronic typewriter.  I will post about it later this week.

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Underwood Typewriter
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Voigtlander Vitessa rangefinder camera
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Marshall’s Photo Retouching Kit
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Bronson Altoona Casting Reel, fishing reel
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Kid’s fancy western two gun rig, gun belt with revolvers
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old Dodge

photos Antietam Battlefield, US CIVIL WAR


Antietam Battlefield from my trip in 2002 some of my shots from that day were made with a Voigtlander Cosina T101 rangefinder film camera and the CV Classic f2.5 35mm ltm lens.

The Battle of Antietam /ænˈttəm/ also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, particularly in the South, fought on Wednesday, September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland, and Antietam Creek, as part of the Maryland Campaign, was the first major battle in the American Civil War to take place on Union soil. It is the bloodiest single-day battle in American history, with 22,717 dead, wounded, and missing on both sides combined.

The bridge is known as Burnside’s Bridge for the Union General who kept sending Union troops to cross it and where many were killed by Confederate sharpshooters who were positioned on the high ground on the west side of the creek.

I stood up there and could judge how effective was the firing angle of their hilltop position.