Twilight Photos Tay Township Backroads


Tay Township 100 miles north of Toronto, Sony NEX F3 with Sony 18-55mm lens, edited using Corel Paint Shop Pro X5.

November light fading. temperature -1 degrees Celsius, dusting of snow lingering.

A few of these shots are within yards of a 17th century Huron village site.  It is debated whether it is the site of the martyrdom of St. Jean de Brebeuf, St. Gabriel Lalemant (French Jesuit missionaries) and many Christian Hurons at the hands of the warring Iroquois in 1649.  Whenever I stop and look and photograph these spots, my imagination turns back and I keep one eye out for those Iroquois.  This creek with the still water was most likely the water supply for that village.

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photo of a very old Huron/French fish trap


This fish trap hangs inside the blockhouse near the entrance to Ste. Marie Among the Hurons, reconstructed fortified French mission 1640s era. Midland, Ontario, Canada. It measures about 3 feet in diameter at its widest point and here is collapsed, in use it would be pulled out to its full length, placed in the river or lake and the fish would enter the wide mouth and end up trapped in the narrow end. Of wood stick construction.

camera Nikon 5700, handheld.

July 2 2012: when I put my brain to think about one of my better photos, one I would be proud for anyone to see with my name attached, this comes to mind.

1640s Huron Village St Ignace II altar


Saint Gabriel Lallemant
Saint Gabriel Lallemant (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

DSC_5553 St Ignace II altar by gnawledge wurker
DSC_5553 St Ignace II altar, a photo by gnawledge wurker on Flickr.

description by T. Fegarty “In 1649 St. Ignace II, as named by the Jesuit missionaries who visited or lived there, was a relatively new Wendat village on a plateau about 50 feet above what is now known as the Sturgeon River in Tay Township. The village proper comprised 29 buildings, including a chapel – priests’ residence, occupied some 6 acres, and was surrounded by fortifications measuring some 2,000 feet in the round, including 2 main gateways. About 2 thousand people lived there.

The Wendat chose village sites for their defensive advantages: high ground, surrounding river and/or ravine and nearby year-round spring. Villages were fortified by palisades of pine trunks, some 15 feet tall. The people lived in long-houses, about 20 feet in width and up to 100 feet in length, with 20-100 people per house. These dwellings were constructed of saplings, their pointed and charred ends planted in holes in the ground. A census of the Huron nation by the Jesuits in 1639 reported 32 active villages, consisting of about 700 lodges and 20,000 people.

1649 saw the culmination of the war between the Wendat and their French allies against the Iroquois confederacy based in what is now upper New York State. A large Iroquois war party attacked and overran several Wendat villages, including St. Ignace II. At nearby St. Louis, on the Hogg River, the raiders captured two Jesuit missionaries, Jean de Brebeuf and Gabriel Lalemant, and brought them to St Ignace II, where they were tortured and killed. These events led the Jesuits to abandon and burn their headquarters at Ste. Marie on the Wye River, after burying the remains of Brebeuf there. They then retreated with their remaining Wendat converts first to Christian Island and then to Quebec in the following year. They took with them relics (small bone fragments) of the martyrs.”