Field Photos


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Tay Township in central Ontario

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Twilight Photos Tay Township Backroads


Tay Township 100 miles north of Toronto, Sony NEX F3 with Sony 18-55mm lens, edited using Corel Paint Shop Pro X5.

November light fading. temperature -1 degrees Celsius, dusting of snow lingering.

A few of these shots are within yards of a 17th century Huron village site.  It is debated whether it is the site of the martyrdom of St. Jean de Brebeuf, St. Gabriel Lalemant (French Jesuit missionaries) and many Christian Hurons at the hands of the warring Iroquois in 1649.  Whenever I stop and look and photograph these spots, my imagination turns back and I keep one eye out for those Iroquois.  This creek with the still water was most likely the water supply for that village.

new beach park in Victoria Harbour, Ontario


Tay Township put in place this small beach park in downtown Victoria Harbour, next to what was once the covered town dock but which has more recently been assumed by the Federal Govt.

Nice sandy beach, fairly shallow for the kids, lots of sod put in, a gazebo and a few tall shade trees, although a good umbrella might be a wise thing to bring along, remember your sun safety.

Sony H50 shot of the new Gazebo

Hogg Bay Trestle Bridge 2141 feet long, 1908-1978


scan of an old print of a photo I took back in 1975 — Spanning the waters of Hogg Bay, a great wooden trestle bridge was built in 1908 to carry the Canadian Pacific Railroad from grain elevators at Port McNicholl. 2141 feet long and 50 feet high, it was one of the longest wooden structures on the continent. The pine timbers were 8 feet by 16 feet and pilings of B.C. fir were 65 feet long. The builder was Mike McPeake of Port McNicholl. Patrolled by armed guards in both World Wars, this unique and handsome bridge was last used in 1971 and demolished in 1978.

to see two more photos of mine of the trestle see this link to an earlier post